Olanzapine

Choosing Among Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics: Practical Aspects

David N. Osser, MD Associate Professor of Psychiatry Harvard Medical School Brockton Division of the VA Boston Healthcare System   First-generation LAIs (haloperidol, fluphenazine) have higher rates of acute extrapyramidal symptoms, tardive dyskinesia and hyperprolactinemia symptoms compared to most second-generation antipsychotics. However, they have lower costs. Most second-generation antipsychotics cost more than $1000 a month,…

Read More

Antipsychotics for Agitation: Differences Between Tablets, Orally Disintegrating Tablets and Sublingual Formulations

Michael D. Jibson, MD, PhD Professor of Psychiatry Director of Residency Education University of Michigan This presentation discusses how to prescribe oral antipsychotics for acute agitation (standard tablets, orally disintegrating tablets, and a sublingual formulation). Orally disintegrating antipsychotics (Abilify Discmelt, Zyprexa Zydis, Risperdal M-Tab) are not absorbed transmucosally, they have to be swallowed. Orally disintegrating…

Read More

Olanzapine Interactions

Source: Drug labeling information submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), updated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). The risks of using olanzapine in combination with other drugs have not been extensively evaluated in systematic studies. Potential for Other Drugs to Affect Olanzapine Diazepam — The co-administration of diazepam with olanzapine potentiated the orthostatic…

Read More

Olanzapine Adverse Effects

Source: Drug labeling information submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), updated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Most common adverse reactions (≥5% and at least twice that for placebo) associated with: Oral Olanzapine Monotherapy: Schizophrenia (Adults) – postural hypotension, constipation, weight gain, dizziness, personality disorder, akathisia Schizophrenia (Adolescents) – sedation, weight increased, headache, increased…

Read More

Mechanism of Action and Pharmacodynamics of Olanzapine

By: Flavio Guzman, MD Olanzapine is a second-generation antipsychotic that acts as antagonist at 5HT2A and D2 receptors. Mechanism of Action The mechanism of action of olanzapine, as with other drugs having efficacy in schizophrenia, is unknown. However, it has been proposed that this drug’s efficacy in schizophrenia is mediated through a combination of dopamine…

Read More

Olanzapine Indications: FDA-Approved Uses

Source: Drug labeling information submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), updated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Olanzapine (Zyprexa) is a second-generation antipsychotic approved for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A combination of the antidepressant fluoxetine and olanzapine (OFC, olanzapine/fluoxetine combination) is also available under the trade name Symbyax. List of…

Read More

Olanzapine Pharmacokinetics

Source: Drug labeling information submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), updated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Oral Administration Oral Administration, Monotherapy — Olanzapine is well absorbed and reaches peak concentrations in approximately 6 hours following an oral dose. It is eliminated extensively by first pass metabolism, with approximately 40% of the dose…

Read More